Category: Grammar

Word formation
Word formation

I always loved the word formation part of the FCE test. This was the part of the test where I always scored really high. However, some of my students don’t. So I sat down and tried to find out why I have been so successful in this part of the test.

And the result? I believe that I do well on these tests because I know the other forms of words. I take the key word and then learn all of its other forms, and when I meet the word in a test I am able to remember the correct form.

In this post I am going to give you a chance to do the same. I selected 10 words that regularly appear in the word formation test for B2 level, and I listed all the forms and example sentences. What should you do? Try to memorise all the forms from the infographic and then go through the online quizzes.
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Word formation – infographic

[/su_heading][su_spacer] Study the following infographic and try to remember all the forms. Do not forget to notice the differences in meaning.

ADVERT:
[showmyads]

Word formation_fce_mindmapA

Do not spend too much time just learning the forms. It is best to use them in context, so I believe it is time to move to the online quizzes.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Word formation – online quizzes

[/su_heading][su_spacer]

The first online quiz is in HTML5 so it will play on all devices. Your task is to choose the correct form of the words, and if you pass the quiz you will be given a chance to play a game as a reward.
[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/vocabulary/wordformation/Word formation 01 (Web)/index.html” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]Word formation quiz – full screen[/su_button]

The second game is called En Garde and it will only play on your desktop as it is made in flash. Your task is to choose the correct answer and then stop the circle as close to the centre as possible. Will you win?

[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/vocabulary/wordformation/index.html” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]Word formation quiz – full screen[/su_button] [su_spacer][su_heading]

Word formation – links

[/su_heading][su_spacer] You can find more interesting exercises at the British Council site.

The verb have got
The verb have got

For an unknown reason many elementary textbooks teach HAVE GOT at the very beginning. Students find it difficult and they get confused. Moreover, they get even more fed up when they learn that the Americans do not use this form.
But I have to teach the grammar, so there is no use crying over spilt milk. To be honest, I was not very successful the last time I taught this grammar, and that is why I decided to create some new materials.
In this post you will find a song, an infographic, a worksheet with communicative activities, and an interactive online quiz.
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Have got – song

[/su_heading][su_spacer] Start the lesson with the following song. Ask the students to listen and complete the lyrics. Check their answers and ask the students to listen and sing along. In this way they will practise their pronunciation and grammar at the same time.
ADVERT:
[showmyads]

Have got song lyrics

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Have got – infographic

[/su_heading][su_spacer]

Now draw the students’ attention to the following infographic. Explain the form of the verb have got. This may be the right time to drill the form.

Have got full infographic

Once you have explained the grammar, it is time to practise it using the following worksheet. Download it and print it out.

Have got communicative worksheet

Ask the students to work in pairs. They must not show their pictures to their partners.
In the first exercise they look at their picture and write what they have in the bag.
In the second exercise they write questions asking whether their partner has the same things in their bag . When the students finish writing their questions, they work in pairs and ask and answer in pairs.
In the third exercise, the students look at their bags. Then they look at the objects on the right. They ask their partner whether Jane or David has these things in their bags. They tick or cross out the objects in their pictures.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Have got – online quiz

[/su_heading][su_spacer] The following quiz can be taken at school or you canask your students to do it at home.
In the first part, the students should write correct sentences about the pictures using HAVE GOT. If they produce enough correct sentences, they will be able to play the game called Angry Farmer.
In the second part of the quiz they should first match the pictures and the words and then write them. In the last part of the quiz they have to write the correct answers. Again, if the students pass the quiz they will be rewarded with a game. This time they should write the words they see in the picture (of course, in English).


ADVERT:
[showmyadsa] [su_button url=”https://engames.eu/grammar/have got/Have got online test (Web)/index.html” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]Have got online quiz – full screen[/su_button]

How to Teach Second Conditional
How to Teach Second Conditional

Conditionals scare students to death. They seem complicated and difficult to understand. But as I explain, they only seem to be like this. In fact, they are quite simple and easy to comprehend.

In this post, I will try to keep things as simple as possible. I will deal only with one type of conditional – the second conditional. At the beginning of the post, there is a song that clearly demonstrates the form and the meaning of the grammar. Then there is a mind map and another explanation of the meaning.

[su_spacer]

[su_spacer]

Second conditional – song

First, ask your students to listen and complete the following lyrics. Then ask them to listen and sing the song. In this way they will improve their listening and pronunciation, and they will notice the form of the second conditional.

Second conditional song lyrics

Second conditional song:

[su_spacer]

Second Conditional – Infographic

[su_spacer]
Display the following mind map and ask the students to read the sentences. Then elicit the form of the second conditional.

Second conditional infographics

Draw the students’ attention to the pictures at the bottom of the page and explain the usage of the second conditional. It is used for imagined situations.

[su_spacer]

Second Conditional – Links

[su_spacer]

You can find some excellent materials for teaching the second conditional at the British Council site.

There is a nice explanation of this grammar at the BBC Learning English site too.

Language-rich lesson on questions
Language-rich lesson on questions

Recently I have felt that my lessons are not language rich. And that is something no EFL teacher is happy about.
For example, I have been teaching questions to my fourth graders. We learnt all the vocabulary and grammar, but when I asked my students the questions, they were not able to answer. They did not understand the questions even though they knew all the words and grammar.
ADVERT:
[showmyads]
In this post, I provide a series of entertaining activities in which students can practise and come to understand simple questions.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Vocabulary

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
First, teach the following vocabulary. Read the words aloud and ask your students to repeat them. Then ask them to memorise the words. Give them only three minutes for this. Then ask the students to cover the words inside the circle and write the words in the outer boxes.
Memory test vocabulary

Do not forget to explain the phrase “the biggest” as there is no picture for this word.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Memory test game

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
Ask the students to take a piece of paper and a pen. Play the following video and ask them to answer all the questions. They should answer them as simply as possible.

Ask the students to check their answers at the end of the video. Find out who remembered the most in your class and reward them.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

The memory game

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
Now tell the students that you will play the same game, but this time they have to put the words in the questions into the correct order first. They will get one point for each correct question and one for each correct answer. The picture will show for only 5 seconds, but give the students enough time to write their questions and answers on a piece of paper.

ADVERT:
[showmyadsa]

[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/Memory test/Memory test grammar (Web)/index.html” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]Memory test grammar – full screen[/su_button]

Display the pictures at the end, and ask your students to write their own questions. Then ask them to work in pairs and ask their partner the questions.

Past continuous tense
Past continuous tense

The past continuous tense is one of the most graphical tenses in English. By “graphical” I mean that it is easy to demonstrate the difference between the past simple and past continuous tense in a video or in a short dramatic sketch. Unfortunately, I could not find a video demonstrating the difference betweent the two past tenses, and that is why I created one myself.

ADVERT:
[showmyads]

In addition to this video I created an infographic and an online quiz to practise the past continuous tense.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Past continuous – infographic

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
This infographic explains the form and the usage of the past continuous tense in a graphical way.

past continuous tense infographic

First, concentrate on the form. Explain that the students have to use the verbs WAS or WERE and the verb ending with -ing. Then explain how the negative and questions are formed.
If your students cannot create the -ing form properly, refer to the following post on the present continuous tense, which shows how the -ing verbs are formed.

Once you get to the usage of the past continuous tense, play the video. Play it twice and the second time stop the video and highlight the differences in the scenes and the tenses.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Past continuous – online quiz

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
You can use the following online test in class or you can ask your students to do it at home. The online quiz consists of two parts. In the first part, the students are asked to put the verb into the past continuous tense. In the second part they have to choose either the past simple tense or the past continuous tense.

If you want to play the online quiz in full screen click the button below.

[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/grammar/past_continuous/Past continuous tense (Web)/index.html” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]Past continuous – online quiz[/su_button]

Or you can use the flash version here:

[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/grammar/past_continuous/flash_soubory/past_continuous_quiz.html” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]Past continuous – online quiz[/su_button]
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Past continuous – share

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
More often than not I teach in classrooms with no internet connection, so I realize that it is important to be able to use the activities offline too. You can download the online quiz, the game, and the picture and use them offline:
ADVERT:
[showmyadsa]

Past continuous tense download

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Past continuous tense – links

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
You can find one more post on past continuous tense here.

There is also a good discussion of the past continuous tense at the British Council site.

And the last link is to the BBC Learning English site.

Common mistakes in present tenses in English
Common mistakes in present tenses in English

Present simple and present continuous are easy tenses to learn in English. However, as simple as they are, there are still many students who make mistakes in these English tenses. For this post I have collected the most common mistakes my students make. I believe it is much better to learn from the mistakes others make than to make them yourself and feel stupid.
ADVERT:
[showmyads]
I have included the following activities in this post to help your students avoid mistakes in present tenses: a mind map, a worksheet, an online game on present tenses and an online quiz. I hope you and your students will find them useful.
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Present tense – mind map

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
Ask your students to study the following mind map:
Present tenses common mistakes english
The sentence in the white fields are the mistakes, in the blue fields there are the corrected sentences and at the end, there are explanations.
You should emphasize the fact that students most frequently leave out the verb TO BE in the present continuous tense.
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Present tense – online quiz

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
I have prepared two online quizzes this time. The first one is in Flash and it will play only on desktops. The aim of the game is to highlight the mistakes students make in English tenses. In the game students should choose the correct option and then shoot all the bad ducks. They can shoot a bottle on the side of the screen and get a bonus.

[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/common_mistakes/Present_perfect_mistakes_ontarget.html” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]Present tenses – online game[/su_button]

The second is an online quiz in which the students should fill in the verbs in the correct form of the present tense. The passing grade is set to 75%. As this online quiz is in HTML5, they can do it on their mobile devices too.

[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/common_mistakes/Present tenses (Web)/index.html” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]Present tenses – online quiz[/su_button]
ADVERT:
[showmyadsa]
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Present tense – worksheet

[/su_heading][su_spacer]

The following worksheet contains only two activities. The first one is called Hidden Picture. The students should colour the squares that contain a correct sentence. If they colour the squares correctly, a shape will emerge.
The second activity is a simple fill in the gap exercise. The students should complete the sentences with the correct form of the verb.
Present tenses worksheet

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Present tenses – download

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
More often than not I teach in classrooms with no internet connection, so I realize that it is important to be able to use the activities offline too. You can download the online quiz, the game, and the picture and use them offline:
Common mistakes present_tenses

English as a second language – Basic questions
English as a second language – Basic questions

When students start to learn English as a second language, there is a set of basic questions in English they need to master. All language courses start with these questions, but many people struggle to learn them. It is necessary to learn these by heart. However, you also need to be able to vary them a bit.
To help you teach or learn these questions I have devised the following activities: a mind map showing the basic questions for students of English as a second language, a worksheet with several communicative and drilling exercises, a song to help in memorising the questions and an online quiz. If you like the activities, please do not hesitate to comment below.
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Basic question – song

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
I love starting lessons with something interesting. Students like songs, so I start the lesson with a simple song containing all the basic questions students of English as a second language need to learn.
Ask the students to listen to the song and complete the following worksheet:
Song lyrics fill-in

Play the song twice and then play the song on a whiteboard and ask the students to check their answers.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Basic question – mind map

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
Ask the students to have a look at this mind map and deduce the meaning of the questions – using the lyrics and the mind map.
Basic questions for learners of English as a second language

Ask the students to work in pairs and ask each other these questions.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Basic question – worksheet

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
The following worksheet contains several activities. First ask the students to find the questions for the fields a-g (students should only write the letters next to the questions below). Check their answers and tell them to ask you the questions and complete the table with your answers.
Ask them to find the questions for fields 1-7. Check their answers. (It is best to display the correct answers for both groups).
Have your students work in pairs (worksheet A and worksheet B). Ask them to ask the questions and complete their worksheet.
The next task is pure text manipulation. The students should fill in the missing words.
In the third exercise, students should put the words into the correct order to form questions.
In the fourth exercise students are given the answers, and have to write the questions.
In the last exercise students should write the questions using different pronouns.

Basic questions – communicative activities

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Basic question – online quiz

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
In the following online quiz the students should first put the words into the correct order to make questions.
Then they should complete the questions. The online quiz is in HTML5 so it will work on all mobile devices. Students can practise wherever they like.

[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/grammar/basic questions/Basic questions online quiz (Web)/index.html” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]Basic questions – online quiz [/su_button]

The second online quiz is in Flash and will play only on desktops. The aim of the game is to choose the correct question and then hit the opponent.

[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/grammar/basic questions/Basic questions online game engarde.html” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]Basic questions – En garde game[/su_button]

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Basic questions – download

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
More often than not I teach in classrooms with no internet connection, so I realize that it is important to be able to use the activities offline too. You can download the online quiz, the game, and the picture here and use them offline.

Simple questions

Irregular verbs in context – Teacher story
Irregular verbs in context – Teacher story

Teaching irregular verbs in context is not only useful, but rewarding too. A short story attracts the attention of students and can be used in many communicative activities. Unfortunately, there are not many short stories which can be easily used for teaching the past tense.
Advert:
[showmyads]
Luckily, my friend Lynne Blackburn sent me a nice short story to use here. With this post you can teach 8 irregular verbs and practise the past tense of regular verbs. There are many interesting activities which will make it easier for you to teach and for your students to learn. In this post you will find a video, a worksheet, a picture and an interactive exercise. I hope you will find them useful and interesting.
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Irregular verbs in context – the story

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
Here is the story. First, ask your students to have a look at the picture and figure out what happened.
Teacher story sharp

Once, you think the students have had enough of guessing, play the following video.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Irregular verbs in context – the worksheet

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
After watching the video, it is time to start using the worksheet. Download the following worksheet and print one copy for everyone.

Past simple story – worksheet

Ask the students to translate the words in exercise one. They can use dictionaries or their mobile phones to do this.

Then ask the students to read the story again and answer the comprehension questions. You can find the correct answers in the key at the end of the worksheet.

In the third exercise students should complete the text with the correct verbs in the past tense. They can do so either in writing or orally.

The fourth exercise is called Grammar Up. You can find detailed instructions for this exercise in the following video:

In the fifth exercise students should complete the sentences with the correct conjunction. The correct answers are again in the key.

In the sixth exercise students should match the opposites.

In the seventh exercise students should find nine verbs in the past tense.

In the last exercise students should retell the story.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Irregular verbs in context – online quiz

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
Your students can practise the grammar at home or on their mobile devices in the following online quiz:

ADVERT:
[showmyadsa]

[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/grammar/irregular verbs/Past simple story – first day (Web)/index.html” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]Irregular verbs – interactive quiz[/su_button]

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Irregular verbs in context – other posts

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
If you would like to use more stories like this, you could try the following:

  1. Irregular verbs in context – Scream
  2. Irregular verbs in context 1
  3. Teach 9 irregular verbs in one lesson

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Irregular verbs in context – links

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
If you would like more practice with irregular verbs, the British Council has a great site.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Irregular verbs in context – share

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
If you do not have an internet connection at school, you can download the video and online quiz here. Unpack the files and find the index.html and play the quiz.

Past simple all activities

The difference between present simple and continuous tenses
The difference between present simple and continuous tenses

I have already created two posts on the difference between the present simple and continuous tenses. There are Present simple or present continuous tense – improved and Present simple and continuous tenses posts. Both of them are good but as I have come up with a new idea, I want to share it with you in this post.

This post concentrates on the difference between the tenses. If you are not sure about the form of the tenses, you should see the following posts first:

  1. Present simple tense
  2. Present continuous tense

ADVERT:
[showmyads]
In this post there are just two activities: a worksheet and an interactive quiz. I hope that they will help you with teaching the difference between the tenses.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Present simple and continuous tense – worksheet

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
Hand out the following worksheet (students have to work in pairs; one will need worksheet A and the other worksheet B) and ask the students not to show their picture to their partner. Ask them to describe what the people, whose names they know, are doing. Their partner has to listen and complete their own picture by filling in the names.

In exercise 2 they should complete the sentences with the correct names.

When they finish, it is time to explain the difference between the tenses. The present continuous tense is used to describe what the people are doing right now. However, when the students have a look at the rooms in their pictures they will see several objects there. For example, in the kitchen there is a basketball. James is not playing basketball now, but he plays it sometimes and that is why the ball is there.
You can go on like this with three or four more pictures. Then ask the students to complete exercise 3.

In exercise 4, students should take the picture and speak about it for 60 seconds without stopping or hesitating. Will they manage?

In the last exercise, ask the students to turn the paper over and write 10 sentences about it.

Present simple and continuous tense – worksheet
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Present simple and continuous tense – interactive quiz

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
The following interactive quiz is based on the picture in the worksheet. It is ideal for homework or for a class where everyone has a smart phone with an internet connection. The quiz is in HTML5 and therefore will work on all mobile devices.
In the quiz students will practise the grammar they’ve learnt in the worksheet.

ADVERT:
[showmyadsa]
If you want to have the quiz on the full screen click the button below.
[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/grammar/present_simple_vs_continuous/Present simple and continuous quiz (Web)/index.html” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]Present tenses – Full screen[/su_button]
[su_spacer]

Present simple and continuous tense – more practice

[su_spacer]
If you need more practice, you could try the following pages:

British Council page on present simple and continuous

Here are two useful videos:


Present simple tense for elementary students
Present simple tense for elementary students

Present simple is one of the most important tenses in English. It is quite easy to teach and learn but it must be done properly. In this post I am going to teach some vocabulary first and then teach the forms using the verbs.
ADVERT:
[showmyads]
In this post you can find a worksheet, a video and an interactive quiz to teach the vocabulary for daily activities. Once your students know the verbs it is time to introduce the forms – present simple tense affirmative, present simple tense negative and present simple tense questions.
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Daily activities

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
First have a look at the following pictionary:
Daily routine pictionary

If you need the pronunciation, you should try the following video. In the second part of the video there is a quiz to practise the words. There appear the words and you have about 3 seconds to say the word before you hear it.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Daily activities – worksheets

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
To practise the vocabulary there are several activities. The first one is an interactive quiz. You have three tasks. First, match the words and the pictures, second, click the correct image and third write the words. The quiz is in HTML5 so it will work anywhere.

If you would like to play the quiz on the full screen, click the following button.
[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/grammar/present_simple/Daily activities – vocabulary (Web)/index.html” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]Daily activities – quiz[/su_button]

There are four more activities in a print form. Print out the following worksheets and solve them:
Daily routine_worksheet

When the students know the vocabulary, I believe it is time to introduce the grammar.
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Daily activities – song

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
Here is a short song to practise the daily activities. It may serve as a good way to introduce the grammar too, as all the sentences are in present simple tense.

You could just play the song to the students or you could ask them to listen and complete the lyrics
I wake up in the morning

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Present simple tense – grammar

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
Here is the infographic for present simple tense:
ADVERT:
[showmyadsa]
Present simpe tense complet mind map

The infographic contains a lot of details. If you think it would be too much for your students, feel free to cut it into parts and present the different forms at different times.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Present simple tense – stories

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
To help my students remember the grammar, I tell stories. I tell them in their mother tongue as their purpose is to help the students remember the grammar. I have already presented the story about questions here and you can find it in our post on Questions.
Here, there are two more stories to highlight the grammar.
The first story explains why people use the ending -s in third person singular.
In English there is the sound PSST which is used to draw someone’s attention. A long long time ago people did not gossip. But then they started to speak about someone else but no one listened. But those people who gossiped needed attention so they started to use the PSST sound. They said:
Nikola (
use students’ names, it is more fun and people listen) cook PSST very badly.
Adam play PSST football. Jane like PSST English. And so on.
And as people spoke quicker and quicker they soon reduced the PSST sound to the ending -s. So ever since when we speak about 1 person who is not me or you, we use the ending -s.

The other story explains the usage of DON’T.
Do you know what sound do bells make in English. DING DONG! It is very important because I will tell you a story that happened in the year 756. On 15th June suddenly three bells fell from a church tower in the English town Epston and they became alive. Suddenly they had legs and they walked around the country. And they spoke. People came to them and they asked them. “Do you live here?” “We,” started the bells but suddenly the sound DONG came from inside, “DONG live here.”
“Do you like music?” people asked.
“We DONG like music?”
“Do you do any work?”
“We DONG work.”
People spoke about these bells everywhere. “They dong like music.” “They dong work.” And as the time passed they changed the DONG sound to don’t and ever since we use DON’T in negative sentences. Later people added the form DOESN’T in third person singular.
And what happened to the bells? As they could not do anything they put them back on the tower and they never became alive again.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Present simple tense – grammar practice

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
To practice the grammar I have created the following interactive quizzes.
The first quiz is a game calleed On Target. Your aim is to choose the correct answer and then shoot as many bad ducks as possible. You can shoot a bottle on the side too and win a bonus. The game is in flash and it plays on desktops only.

To play the game on the full screen, click the button below.

[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/grammar/present_simple/present simple tense_target.html” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]Present simple tense – On Target[/su_button]

The second quiz is in HTML5 and thus it will play everywhere.

To play the game on the full screen, click the button below.

[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/grammar/present_simple/Present simple tense (Web)/index.html” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]Present simple tense – QUIZ[/su_button]

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Present simple tense – Communicative activities

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
You might miss here a worksheet with some communicative activities. So do I. But as I do not have any I would like to ask you to send me yours. If it is good and I decide to publish it here, I will Paypal you 10$. Please send the worksheets to rotreklzdenek@gmail.com. Thank you.
Remember the worksheets have to be your own.

Irregular verbs in context – Scream
Irregular verbs in context – Scream

Teaching irregular verbs can be fun. The verbs are easy to use to tell stories and stories are interesting for everyone.
In the following post I am going to tell a story and you can learn the past tense of ten irregular verbs there.
ADVERT:
[showmyads]
To achieve this there are a video, a worksheet, a comic and an interactive quiz. I hope you will find them interesting.
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Scream story – video

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
Watch the following story. The story is easy to follow as the colour follows the voice.

If you prefer telling the story yourself, you can use the following comic:
Irregular verbs in context Scream story
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Scream story – worksheet

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
Once you introduce the story, it is time to deal with the language. First, translate the words in the table and then ask the students to read the story again and answer the comprehension questions. Of, course you can play the video instead.
Then ask the students to complete the text and in the end ask them to solve the crossword. Once they solve the crossword using the past tense ask them to work in pairs and retell the story using the comic.

Past-simple-story_scream_original_ws_better
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Irregular verbs – interactive quiz

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
When you finish the worksheet, you can ask the students to do the following interactive quiz. As the quiz is in HTML5 they could try it out on their mobiles or you could do it on an interactive whiteboard.

If you want to play the quiz on the full screen, click the button below.
[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/irregular_verbs/scream/Scream irregular verbs (Web)/index.html” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]IRREGULAR VERBS SCREAM STORY[/su_button]

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Irregular verbs – share

[/su_heading][su_spacer]

If you like the quiz above and you would like to share it on your blog or use it in a classroom without an internet connection, you can do this. You can download all the files here and upload them to your site just unpack the files and use them in the classroom:
ADVERT:
[showmyadsa]
Scream

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Irregular verbs – more resources

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
If you would like to practise a bit more, here are several resources you might like.
Irregular verbs in context
Teach 9 irregular verbs in context
Several videos:

Other sites:
British council site
Learn English for teenagers

Wish clauses for intermediate students
Wish clauses for intermediate students

In the following post intermediate students of English can learn to form wish clauses starting with I WISH or IF ONLY. In my opinion wish clauses are quite easy to master. However, if you feel it differently, there are several helpful features to change your mind. There are several interactive quizzes, an explanatory video and an infographic.
ADVERT:
[showmyads]
If you have a blog or a website, where you would like to share the content published here, you can do so by downloading the zip file at the end of the post and uploading it to your web.
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Wish clauses – infographic

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
The following infographic contains the basic explanation how to form wish clauses.
Wish clauses infographic
I did not manage to get into the infographic several pieces of information. First, if you regret something something that you did not do in the past and you use the verb could, you do not use the past perfect tense but you use the form COULD HAVE DONE something.
Second, we use the from I WISH somebody WOULD do something, if we are angry and we would like someone to change their behaviour right now and keep it changed in the future too.
Third, in wish clauses we can use WERE instead of WAS and it is still correct.
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Wish clauses – video

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
At BBClearningEnglish.com they publish great materials for learning English. However, most often than not they publish their material as an mp3 file instead of video. That is why I have turned their wonderful Grammar Challenge on regrets into the following video.

You can find the original mp3 file at http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/radio/specials/922_gramchallenge5/
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Wish clauses – quizzes

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
The following interactive quizzes are in HTML5 so they will play in all browsers on all mobile devices.
The quizzes contain nearly 30 sentences to practise the grammar. If you pass the test you can play a short game.

If you prefer doing the quiz on the full screen click the button below:

[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/grammar/wish_clauses/new_version/Wish clauses quiz (Web)/index.html” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]WISH CLAUSES – full screen quiz[/su_button]

[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/grammar/wish_clauses/new_version/Wish clauses quiz_flash (Web)/index.html” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]WISH CLAUSES – flash quiz[/su_button]
https://engames.eu/grammar/wish_clauses/new_version/Wish clauses quiz_flash (Web)/index.html
If you feel you have not had enough practice, you can go to British council site and try the quizzes there.
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Wish clauses – share

[/su_heading][su_spacer]

If you like the quiz above and you would like to share it on your blog or use it in a classroom without an internet connection, you can do this. You can download all the files here and upload them to your site just unpack the files and use them in the classroom:
ADVERT:
[showmyadsa]
wish clauses002

Little and Few – learn the difference
Little and Few – learn the difference

The difference between LITTLE and FEW, especially when you add A LITTLE and A FEW, causes a lot of problems event to students whose English is really good. In this post I try to teach the difference in a graphical way. Having studied the infographic, you should try the interactive quiz and check whether you really got the grammar right.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Few and Little – infographics

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
Study the infographic. Notice the difference between A LITTLE and LITTLE. If there is the article A – it means that there is some. Without the article we say that there is not enough of something.
ADVERT:
[showmyads]

Few and little infographic

If you think you understand the concept, it is time to check your understanding in the following quiz.
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Few and Little – quiz

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
The following quiz is in HTML5, so it will play on all mobile devices. If you pass the test, you will be given the chance to play the game TIC-TAC-TOE against the computer. Remember that it is possible to beat the computer, but it might take you some time before you find the correct way.

You can take the quiz on the full screen by clicking the button:
[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/countable/Few and little (Web)/index.html” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]Few and little – full screen[/su_button]

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Few and Little – more practice

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
If you feel you need more practice, you should try the following pages:

The difference between Little and Few is a part of a larger concept called countability in English. If you would like to understand the whole concept, I can recommend the following posts:

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Little and Few – share

[/su_heading][su_spacer]

If you like the quiz above and you would like to share it on your blog or use it in a classroom without an internet connection, you can do this. You can download all the files here and upload them to your site just unpack the files and use them in the classroom:
ADVERT:
[showmyadsa]
Few and little (Web)

Possessive case #2
Possessive case #2

I have already published a post on possessive case. But when I tried to teach it again, I found out that it was not clear enough for the group I am teaching now. So I created a new infographic and several new interactive exercises in which students can practise the grammar. And my new students understand it now nearly perfectly. I hope you will find these materials useful too.
ADVERT:
[showmyads]
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Possessive case – infographic

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
Have a look at this infographic and see how we form the possessive case in English.
Possessive case mind map
To cut the explanation short, add the apostrophe+s to a singular noun and add only the apostrophe to a regular plural noun. If the noun has an irregular plural add the apostrophe+s. If you feel that you understand the grammar, it is high time to practise it in the following exercises.
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Possessive case – quiz

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
The following quiz is in HTML5, so it will work on all mobile devices. Thus your students can practise the grammar anywhere they like. If they pass the quiz they will be given a chance to play a game as a reward.

If you feel that the quiz is too small, click the button below and play the game on the full screen.

[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/grammar/possessive case/Possessive case_quiz (Web)/index.html” target=”blank” size=”5″]Possessive case – quiz full screen
[/su_button]

If you are looking for more practise I recommend British Council page on possessive case.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Possessive case – share

[/su_heading][su_spacer]

If you like the quiz above and you would like to share it on your blog or use it in a classroom without an internet connection, you can do this. You can download all the files here and upload them to your site just unpack the files and use them in the classroom:
ADVERT:
[showmyadsa]
Possessive case_quiz (Web)

Teach 9 irregular verbs in one lesson
Teach 9 irregular verbs in one lesson

It is much more memorable to teach or learn irregular verbs in a story. The verbs, especially their meaning, are easier to remember and retrieve from memory. Moreover, teaching verbs in a story is fun.
In this post there are several activities: a mind map, a worksheet, an MP3 drill and an interactive quiz. These activities will make the teaching and learning enjoyable and fun.
ADVERT:
[showmyads]
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Irregular verbs – infographics

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
Here is the picture of the story:
Irregular verbs story[su_spacer]

Print version of the story and tasks:
past simple story_fishing full

Here, you can print out the mind map with all the irregular verbs. All the verbs are used in sentences.
irregular verbs in context 2

Once you think that you know the verbs you can try out the following interactive quiz. The quiz is in HTML5 and you can play it on all mobile devices.
[su_button url=”http://www.englishlearningmagazine.com/obsah/irregular verbs in context/Irregular verbs in context 2 (Web)/index.html” target=”blank” size=”5″]Irregular verbs – full screen quiz
[/su_button]

MP3 drill
Listen say the word that belongs there instead of the beep.
[su_spacer]
[su_button url=”http://www.englishlearningmagazine.com/obsah/irregular verbs in context/David story_beepdrill.mp3″ target=”blank” size=”5″]Irregular verbs – mp3 drill
[/su_button]

The worksheet contains the grammar up activity. To do it correctly here is a simple explanation:

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Irregular verbs – share

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
If you like this activity and you would like to use in either on your website or in a classroom without an internet connection, you can do so by downloading the files here:

irregular_verbs_incontext#2

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Blog competition

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
Macmillan-Dictionary-Love-English-Awards-2014Macmillan publishing house runs a competition Love English Awards and as this site has been nominated, you can vote for us here. Thank you for your support.

Present continuous tense
Present continuous tense

Today I experienced the great teaching moment when one of my not so proficient students said that she can understand the grammar perfectly and that it is really easy. I was exalted.
I was teaching present continuous tense and the students really liked it and at the end of the lesson they were able to form the affirmative sentences correctly. In this post I would like to share all the activities I used to achieve this. There are an infographic explaining the grammar, a worksheet and an interactive quiz. I hope you will like it.
ADVERT:
[showmyads]
Please, if you spot a mistake leave a comment and I will try to correct it as soon as possible. Thank you.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Present continuous tense – worksheet and infographics

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
When I start teaching present continuous tense I do not present the following infographic till we finish the first exercise from the following worksheet.

Once we check the exercise 1, I hand out the following infographic and ask the students to go through it and then I explain it.

present continuous_eng_mindmap

When I finish my short explanation I ask the students to complete the exercise 2 in the Present continuous affirmative_worksheet. We check the answers and then I explain the addition of the -ing ending. And then the students have to do the exercise 3. Here they add the -ing ending to the verbs.

In exercise 4 the students are asked to write what the people and animals are doing in the pictures. Remind them not to forget the correct form of the verb TO BE in each sentence. In exercise 5, the pupils finish the sentences in a logical way using the present continuous tense.

At the end of the lesson I asked my students to work in pairs and describe the picture we used at the beginning of the lesson.

It worked for my class. Will it work for yours?

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Present continuous tense – interactive quiz

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
You can start the practice session with the video guessing game. The man will start drawing a picture and he will stop at one moment. A question will appear and you should answer it. The correct answer will appear a few seconds later.

ADVERT:
[showmyadsa]
Once we finish the exercises at school you can ask your students to practise the grammar at home. They can try to do the following interactive quiz. If they pass it they will be given a chance to play a game. The quiz is in HTML5 so it will work on all mobile devices.

[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/grammar/present_simple_vs_continuous/Present continuous quiz (Web)/index.html” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]Present continuous tense quiz – full screen[/su_button]

You can expand your knowledge about present continuous tense at British Council pages.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Present continuous tense – share

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
If you like the two games above and you would like to share them on your blog or use them in a classroom without an internet connection, you can do this. You can download all the files here:

Present continuous quiz (Web)

Some and Any – English grammar
Some and Any – English grammar

The usage of the words SOME and ANY is really easy. However, some textbooks like to mix this grammar with the concept of countability and thus they confuse the students. These two words have very little to do with countability. In my opinion their usage is dependent on completely different factors.
In this post I would like to show how I teach the usage of SOME and ANY. There is an infographic to help me and several exercises to practise this grammar.
ADVERT:
[showmyads]
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Some and Any – infographics

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
When I teach this grammar, I print out the following infographics and ask my students to have a look at it for one minute. Then I ask them to explain the grammar. Surprisingly, more often than not they are capable of explaining the grammar without my intervention.
Some and Any infographics

Once I elicit the usage of the two words, I verify the students knowledge with the following exercises and games.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Some and Any – exercises and games

[/su_heading][su_spacer]

The first quiz is created in HTML 5 so it will play on all mobile devices. It is not a bad idea to ask your students from time to time to use their mobiles and do the exercise online. They will feel happy that they can use their mobile phones or tablets at school.

[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/some and any/Some and Any_games (Web)/index.html” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]Some and Any quiz – full screen[/su_button]

The second game is called On target and students at school love it. Your aim is to choose the correct answer and then shoot as many bad ducks as possible. Moreover, you can get a bonus if you shoot one of the bottles on the side. This game is in flash and therefore will work only on desktops.

[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/some and any/Some_any_ontarget.html” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]Some and Any quiz – full screen[/su_button]

If you do not have an interactive whiteboard at school, you will appreciate the print version of the quiz:

Some and Any_print version

If you feel that there are not enough exercises at this site you can visit British Council site and learn more about SOME and ANY there.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Blog competition

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
Macmillan-Dictionary-Love-English-Awards-2014Macmillan publishing house runs a competition Love English Awards and as this site has been nominated, you can vote for us here. Thank you for your support.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

How much and How many – share

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
If you like the two games above and you would like to share them on your blog or use them in a classroom without an internet connection, you can do this. You can download all the files here:

Some and any zip file with the games

How much or How many?

The post on countability has been the seventh most viewed post at our site. More nearly 95,000 people have seen it and hopefully used it. While the post is great for intermediate students of English, it is very theoretical. This post aims to be more practical and for a bit lower level of students. Here I would like to teach the usage of HOW MUCH and HOW MANY using as few words as possible.

To achieve this there are two games and a mind map. I hope you will find the post useful and practical.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

How much and How many – mind map

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
In this mind map I try to explain the usage as graphically as possible. I always first ask the students to look at the mind map and then I try to elicit what it tries to teach. Only if this fails (and it happens very seldom) I explain the mind map myself.

ADVERT:
[showmyads]
How many mind map
How much mind map

[su_spacer][su_heading]

How much and How many – mind map

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
Once your students understand the concept, it is time to move to the usage. In the following two games they are asked to choose the correct form: either HOW MUCH or HOW MANY. Both of the games are in Flash and therefore they will play only on some mobile devices. However, the games will work perfectly on all desktops.

The second game is called En Garde and your task is to answer correctly and then inflict as much damage to your opponent as possible. Enjoy.

[su_spacer][su_button url=”https://engames.eu/countable/Howmuch_howmany_engarde.swf” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]How much and How many – Penalty – full screen[/su_button][su_spacer]

The first game is called Penalty ShootOut. If you choose the correct answer you are given a chance to kick a penalty. Good luck


[su_spacer][su_button url=”https://engames.eu/countable/countable_vs_uncountable_penalty.swf” target=”blank” background=”#f08cf5″ size=”6″]How much and How many – Penalty – full screen[/su_button][su_spacer]
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Blog competition

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
Macmillan-Dictionary-Love-English-Awards-2014Macmillan publishing house runs a competition Love English Awards and as this site has been nominated, you can vote for us here. Thank you for your support.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

How much and How many – share

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
If you like the two games above and you would like to share them on your blog or use them in a classroom without an internet connection, you can do this. You can download all the files here:
The games How much and How many

Five tenses – more exercises
Five tenses – more exercises

About half a year ago I published a post where I tried to explain the usage of 5 different tenses. About 71,000 people have viewed this post but several complained that there was not enough practice. That is why I have decided to reintroduce this topic and add three more quizzes to practise the five tenses. So here we go!

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Five tenses – mind map

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
Study the following mind map. There I try to explain the usage of the following tenses: Present simple, present perfect simple, present continuous, be going to and past simple.
ADVERT:
[showmyads]

Five tenses mind map

And if you think you understand the grammar, it is time to try the quiz.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

Five tenses – quiz

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
You can choose either the print version of the quiz or the digital version of the quiz.
You can download the word document here and you can edit it in any way you like. The key is included.

Cloze exercises

If you prefer the interactive version of the same quiz, you can find it down here.


[su_spacer]
[su_button url=”https://engames.eu/Five tenses_more quizzes (Web)/index.html” target=”blank” size=”5″]Five tenses – full screen quiz
[/su_button]

If you would like to do more practice, you can go to British Council site and try several more exercises there.

Will for the future
Will for the future

There are many different ways to speak about the future in English. You can find all of them in the previous posts on future tenses at Will or be going to or at Be going to post. In this post I would like to explain and teach the usage of WILL for speaking about the future. You are going to find a mind map, a story about WILL and several interactive exercises here. I hope you will find this post useful.
[su_spacer][su_heading]

Will for the future – mind map

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
First study the form of WILL in the following mind map:
ADVERT:
[showmyads]

Will mind map

Once you present the form of the verb WILL it is time to explain the usage. I prefer using stories when explaining the grammar. I do it this way because stories are more memorable than just a simple explanation. You can create your own story or you can use mine. If you are afraid that your students´ English is not good enough you can tell the story in their Mother tongue.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

The story about WILL

[/su_heading][su_spacer]
Ever since Will was born he was strange.
He looked like a normal boy but he wasn’t. He irritated people with his behaviour. He simply talked too much
For example when he was at school he always wanted to help other people. But while other children helped without any words WILL always spoke.
“I, Will, help you, sir,” he shouted when he saw the teacher carrying a lot of things.
“I, Will, clean the board,” he jumped up another time.
Of course, his friends did not like it and soon they started to say ironically.
“I will do it.” or “She will do it.”
As I say, Will talked too much. And he liked talking about his opinions.
“I think …” were his favourite words. And as children did not like him they soon parroted.
“He thinks it WILL rain.” “I think I WILL earn a lot of money.“
And one day another strange thing happened. Will’s eyes went big and he started to predict the future.
“There be people on the Moon. We fly to Mars.”
But children did not believe him and they laughed even more.
“There WILL BE people on the Moon. We WILL fly to Mars,” they screamed all over the school.
Nowadays no one remembers Will or his behaviour at school but ever since people still say “I will do it,” when they decide at the moment of speaking to help anyone.
We still say “I think she will fail.” when we express our opinions about the future.

And when we predict something we say “People will not use tablets in 10 years time.”

No one remembers the nerd WILL but his name is there in the sentences.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

WILL for the future – practice

[/su_heading][su_spacer]

You can watch a bit different video explanation the usage of the will form here:

Once you think your students understand the grammar you can try the following quiz:
[su_spacer]
[su_button url=”http://www.englishlearningmagazine.com/obsah/will_presentation/Will quiz (Web)/index.html” target=”blank” size=”5″]WILL – full screen quiz
[/su_button]

[su_spacer][su_heading]

WILL for the future – leave a comment and learn

[/su_heading][su_spacer]

WHAT DO YOU THINK THAT WILL HAPPEN IN THE YEAR 2015.

Write your opinions into the comments and I will correct them and inform you about your grammar.

[su_spacer][su_heading]

WILL for the future – share

[/su_heading][su_spacer]

If you do not have the internet connection in the classroom you can download the quiz and presentation here. Moreover, you can place these at your blog or website 🙂
ADVERT:
[showmyadsa]

Will explanation

Please rate this post below. Our previous post on adverbs of Frequency scored 4.49 stars. Do you think this one is better?